Living or Nonliving Things on a Farm (2023)

Target Grade Level / Age Range:

Kindergarten

(Video) living things and nonliving things | Living and non living things for kids | Living and non living

Time:

30-40 minutes

Purpose:

Students will learn the differences between living and nonliving things and classify items found on a farm accordingly. They will learn what living things need to survive, and what careers work to provide those things. Students will become familiar with some new terms, as well as gain an understanding of life.

Materials:

  • Living or Nonliving Cards
    • Print and cut out before class time
  • Pocket Chart
  • Living and Nonliving by Carol K. Lindeen
    • Other books could be appropriate, such as Farming by Gail Gibbons (available in IALF’s Lending Library)

Suggested Companion Resources:

  • Living and Nonliving By: Carol K. Lindeen

Vocabulary:

  • Living: Things that are alive, such as people, plants, and animals. Living things grow, change, and reproduce.
  • Nonliving: Anything that is not alive, such as rocks, toys, and tools. Nonliving things that cannot move, breathe or reproduce. They do not need food, air and water.
  • Soybeans: Soybeans come from a soybean plant, which are commonly grown in Iowa. Soybeans can be used for soy biodiesel, animal feed, human consumption, or a variety of other things – like seat cushions in cars!
  • Grain Sorghum: A drought tolerant grass that produces a grain sometimes called “milo.” Milo can be fed to animals, or used to make ethanol.
  • Feed: Food fed to farm animals. It usually combines several ingredients to make it a healthy, well balanced meal.
  • Wind turbines: Large, modern, windmills used to collect energy from the wind

Background – Agricultural Connections:

  • Living things can grow, move and change. They need the essentials to survive: air, water, food, and sunlight.
  • There are many things found on a farm, some living and some non-living. Farms are different across Iowa, the US, and the world. Some farmers raise many types of plants and animals, while other specialize in just one or two things. The tools and buildings found on farms vary too.
  • This lesson will help teach the differences between living and nonliving things through the lens of agriculture. Each of the items the students will be working with is somehow related to agriculture. The items in the cards are:
    • Wheat
    • Soybeans
    • Cotton
    • Tomatoes
    • Seeds
    • Corn
    • Squash
    • Cattle
    • Sheep
    • Turkeys
    • Chickens
    • Pigs
    • Goats
    • Barn
    • Water
    • Tractor
      • Tractors can be a good way to challenge students on their understanding of life. Tractors move, make noise, and even need food (fuel)! So why aren’t they alive?
    • Soil
      • Soil can be a tricky one, as it is full of living things. Soil would lose much of its effectiveness without the microbial action that we cannot see. However, soil particles themselves are nonliving.
    • Wind turbines
      • Ask students if the wind turbines are not living, is the wind?
    • Rocks
    • T-shirt
      • The cotton T-shirt may trip some students up. It is made from a living item, however T-shirts cannot grow and develop nor reproduce. Therefore, they are nonliving.
    • Worms
      • Ask students if they like worms? Do they think works are good for the soil? Worms are good for soil, and a sign of healthy soil. Worms aerate the soil by moving through it. The channels they create spaces for water and air, enabling both to reach plants’ roots. Worms also help to break down organic matter, like leaves. Earthworm castings (their poop) add valuable nutrients to the soil.
    • Pizza
      • Pizza is also made from living items, but it is a nonliving thing. Challenge students to look for all of the once-living parts of pizza. Wheat in the crust, tomatoes for sauce, herbs, meat, and even cheese come from living things.
    • Grain sorghum
      • Though grain sorghum is not commonly grown in Iowa, this is an important crop in more southern regions as it is a more drought-tolerant grain. The plant itself without the inflorescence looks a lot like a corn plant does.
    • Truck
    • Corn and soybean meal (feed)
      • Farm animals like cows and pigs eat lots of grains. Farmers may process these grains by grinding, chopping, or otherwise making them more easily digestible. Then, they may add in extra goodies like vitamins and minerals. The result is the feed for the animal, and it is a nonliving thing.

Interest Approach or Motivator:

Ask students what makes something living. Is it movement? Is it ability to make sounds? Are living things always warm? What do living things need?

(Video) Facts From the Farm #4- living vs nonliving.

Procedures:

  1. Start the lesson by giving each student a picture card. Have them look at their photo, read the caption, and decide whether or not the item pictured is living.
    1. Give them the opportunity to ask questions if they have them. Some pictures may be trickier than others. Remember, some things on the non-living list were made from things that were once living things, but are not alive now. Here is the key:

Living

Nonliving

Wheat

Barn

Soybeans

Water

Cotton

Tractor

Tomatoes

Soil

Seeds

Wind Turbine

Corn

Rocks

Squash

T-Shirt

Cattle

Truck

Sheep

Pizza

Turkeys

Corn and soybean meal (feed)

Chickens

Pigs

Goats

Worms

Grain Sorghum

  1. Once students have roughly decided if their item is living or nonliving, have them place their picture card in the correct side of the pocket chart.
    1. If you do not have a pocket chart, students could tape them to the board, chart paper, or lay them on the floor under the correct heading.
    2. Tell students to remember which card was theirs.
  2. After the picture sort, have students turn and talk to the student next to them. Have them talk about the pictures they had and why they placed them where they did. Ask them if there are any pictures they would move and why.
  3. Read: Living and Nonliving
    1. Stop at various points and ask the students why some things are living and why some are nonliving
    2. What do you think living things need in order to survive?
    3. Are we living or nonliving?
    4. How do you know if something is living?
  4. Discuss why it is important that all living things get sunlight, water, air and food
  5. Make a chart. What jobs deal with living things?
    1. How do those professional make sure they are keeping their plants, animals or people alive?
      1. Talk about farmers, agronomists (plant doctors that help farmers), veterinarians, etc. Connect these jobs to parents and doctors and what they do for kids.
    2. If students are having trouble thinking of careers, point to various picture cards and ask students about them.
  6. After discussion, students have to determine if they want to keep their picture card where they originally placed it or move it to the other heading and tell why. Go around the room and ask each student what they think. Use this opportunity to talk to the class about things that contain materials from once living things (like cotton T-shirts and pizza), but that are nonliving things themselves.
  7. Wrap up class with some takeaway concepts from students.

Essential Files:

  • Living or Nonliving Cards
    • Print four cards to a landscape 8.5 x 11” sheet of paper
    • There are 25 cards total. If there are more students, some additions could be hamburgers, pork chops, ethanol, wool, or many others.

Did you know? (Ag facts):

  • Only 2% of the population is involved in production agriculture
  • 97% of farms are family owned

Extension Activities:

  • Have students bring in a picture of something different to add to the Living vs. Nonliving sort

Sources/Credits:

Authors:

Ashley Westhoff

Chrissy Rhodes

Organization Affiliation:

Oskaloosa Elementary School

(Video) Living and Nonliving Farm Lesson

Iowa Agriculture Literacy Foundation

National Agriculture Literacy Outcomes:

  • T2.K-2.e Identify the importance of natural resources (e.g., sun, soil, water, mineral) in farming

Iowa Core Standards:

  • Science:
    • K-LS1-1. Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive.
  • Language Arts:
    • SL.K.3: Ask and answer questions in order to seek help, get information, or clarify something that is not understood.
  • 21 st Century Skills:
    • 21.K-2.ES.2: Recognize different roles and responsibilities and is open to change. ()
    • 21.K-2.ES.3: Learn leadership skills and demonstrate integrity, ethical behavior, and social responsibility.

Living or Nonliving Things on a Farm (1)


This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

(Video) Living Things on the Farm

FAQs

What are non-living things on a farm? ›

Nonliving: Anything that is not alive, such as rocks, toys, and tools. Nonliving things that cannot move, breathe or reproduce. They do not need food, air and water.

What are 5 examples of non-living things? ›

Some examples of non-living things include rocks, water, weather, climate, and natural events such as rockfalls or earthquakes.

What live on a farm? ›

You might see cows, pigs, chickens, horses, sheep, goats, llamas, and donkeys living on farms. Animals such as horses can also help with work on the farm, although farmers do most of this work with machines on modern farms.

What are non-living things in a garden? ›

Nonliving things do not grow, need food, or reproduce. Some examples of important nonliving things in an ecosystem are sunlight, temperature, water, air, wind, rocks, and soil.

What are 10 examples of non-living things? ›

List of ten non-living things
  • Pen.
  • Chair.
  • Bedsheets.
  • Paper.
  • Bed.
  • Book.
  • Clothes.
  • Bag.

Is grass a non-living? ›

Humans, insects, trees, and grass are living things. Nonliving things do not move by themselves, grow, or reproduce. They exist in nature or are made by living things.

What are the 20 non living things? ›

20 example of non-living things:

The example of non- living things are pen, table,phone,book,stool,almirah,bed,chair,bos,door,cot,black borad,mirror,machine,plate,sppone,cup.

What are 10 living things example? ›

Name 10 Living and Non living things.
  • PLANTS.
  • HUMANS.
  • ANIMALS.
  • INSECTS.
  • BIRDS.
  • AMPHIBIANS.
  • REPTILES.
  • MICRO-ORGANISMS.

What are 5 farm animals? ›

Meaning of Farm Animals

Examples include goats, sheep, rabbits, poultry, cattle, pigs, fish, snails, etc.

Whats animals are on a farm? ›

  • Farm animals.
  • Chickens. Chickens.
  • Cows. Cows.
  • Fish. Fish.
  • Pigs. Pigs.
  • Quail. Quail.
  • Rabbits. Rabbits.
  • Sheep. Sheep.

What things are grown on a farm? ›

Food crops are subsistence crops that are meant for human consumption. They include fruits, vegetables, grains, and tubers, like potatoes. Grains, which include crops like wheat, rice, and corn, are the most popular crops in the world, with wheat as the most widely grown crop overall.

What are three non-living things in soil? ›

Soil Layers. Soil is composed of both biotic—living and once-living things, like plants and insects—and abiotic materials—nonliving factors, like minerals, water, and air.

Are tomatoes non-living? ›

Tomato cell is plant cells. As a result, they have a cell wall like other plant cells. The cell wall is made up of pectin and cellulose. It is a non-living structure of the cell.

Is vegetable non-living thing? ›

Unlike animals, plants are made up of many separate parts or modules — leaves and branches, fruits and roots — that can continue to metabolize and survive more or less independently, at least for some time. Even after they've been harvested and cut from one another, their cells remain active and alive.

What are 7 living things? ›

There are seven characteristics of living things: movement, breathing or respiration, excretion, growth, sensitivity and reproduction.

What are 4 examples of living things? ›

Birds, insects, animals, trees, human beings, are a few examples of living things as they have the same characteristic features, like eating, breathing, reproduction, growth, and development, etc.

What are 8 living things? ›

Lesson Summary

These characteristics are reproduction, heredity, cellular organization, growth and development, response to stimuli, adaptation through evolution, homeostasis, and metabolism. Something must have all 8 of these traits to be considered a living thing.

Is trees living or nonliving? ›

Trees, similar to all living things grow, reproduce, and respond to their environment. Trees, like all plants, manufacture their food through photosynthesis.

Is soil a non living? ›

Soil is alive. There are more species of organisms in the soil than there are aboveground. These organisms include everything from badgers and gophers to bacteria and viruses that are invisible to the naked eye. A single handful of soil contains millions of individual living organisms.

Is a wood non living? ›

Wood that has been separated from a tree is considered dead because it is removed from the source of nutrients, much in the same way as meat from a butcher's shop is considered dead because the meat is not receiving nutrients from the animal because it is dead. ... To recap, wood that is attached to a tree is alive.

What is living and non-living examples? ›

Anything that has life is considered a living being. For example– humans, trees, dogs, etc. Things which have no life in them are considered non-living. For example– stone, mountain, watch, etc.

What are the 4 non-living things in the environment? ›

Living things need nonliving things to survive. Without food, water, and air, living things die. Sunlight, shelter, and soil are also important for living things. Living things meet their needs from living and nonliving things in ecosystems.

Is plant a living thing? ›

Plants are living things. Plants are born and grow. Some plants, like geraniums, grow very quickly. Others, like oak trees, grow very slowly.

What is a non-living thing give example? ›

Non-living things are those lacking the characteristics of life. Based on that definition, non-living things include rock, water, sand, glass, and sun. None of them shows the characteristics of being alive. Others define a non-living thing as that, which used to be part of a living thing.

Which list has only non-living things? ›

Sunlight, water and soil are the non-living components of the environment.

What are 5 different living things? ›

Living things are divided into five kingdoms: animal, plant, fungi, protist and monera.

What are all the living and nonliving things in a place? ›

Ecosystem: All living and nonliving things that exist and interact in one place.

What are living and non living things answer? ›

The things or organisms which show the life processes like nutrition, respiration, metabolism, reproduction, respond to stimuli, etc are called living organisms. The things that do not show such life processes are called non-livings.

What are the 7 characteristics of non living things? ›

Non-livings things do not exhibit any characteristics of life. They do not grow, respire, need energy, move, reproduce, evolve, or maintain homeostasis.

Is fish a farm animal? ›

As such, livestock includes animals such as cattle, horses, sheep, and fur-bearing animals, but does not include farmed birds (turkeys, chickens, pigeons, geese), fish, shellfish, amphibians (frogs), and reptiles.

What are the 4 types of farm? ›

Types of Farming
  • Arable: Crops.
  • Pastoral: Animals.
  • Mixed: Crops and animals.
  • Subsistence: Grown just for the farmer and his family.
  • Commercial: Grown to sell.
  • Intensive: High inputs of labour or capital ususally small.
  • Extensive: Low inputs of labour or capital.
  • Sedentary: Permanently in in one place.

What is the three types of farm animals? ›

Types / Forms of Farm Animals
  • a. Poultry Birds: A bird is an animal with a backbone, feathers, and wings for flying. ...
  • b. Work Animals: These farm animals are used for work on the farm. ...
  • d. Livestock Animals: These farm animals are kept for human consumption or for sale. ...
  • e. Guard Animals: ...
  • f. Aquatic Animals:

Which animal live and work on a farm? ›

livestock, farm animals, with the exception of poultry. In Western countries the category encompasses primarily cattle, sheep, pigs, goats, horses, donkeys, and mules; other animals, such as buffalo, oxen, llamas, or camels, may predominate in the agriculture of other areas.

What are plants on a farm called? ›

Agricultural plants are commonly known as: timber, crops, container plants, and turf production.

What do farmers grow on their land? ›

Arable farms produce crops (for example, wheat or vegetables), while pastoral farms raise animals for meat, wool or dairy products. Mixed farming is when a farm grows crops as well as keeping animals.

Whats usually in a farm? ›

IRS definition of what qualifies as a farm

A farm includes livestock, dairy, poultry, fish, vegetables and fruit. Individuals or businesses that meet the definition of farming may be able to deduct certain farm-related expenses or losses as part of their annual tax filing.

Are potatoes non-living? ›

Potatoes are living things that depend on nonliving things, like sunlight and soil nutrients, to grow. Potatoes are an important food, grown and eaten by many different cultures around the world.

Are potatoes living? ›

Below are six special facts about potatoes you probably didn't know. 1. They're still alive when you buy them! Unlike a harvested carrot, for example, a potato is still alive when you find it in the grocery store.

Are onions non-living? ›

Onions are loaded with cells so onions must be a living thing.

Are eggs non-living? ›

Solution : Egg is a living entity as it contains substance of life inside and it later on develops to produce a living organism. Though it does not show some characteristic features like those of a typical living being. Such as movement, etc, it is considered as a living entity.

Is fruit a non-living things? ›

Expert-Verified Answer

Fruits and vegetables when they are in plants they grow and hence they are called as living things. But once plucked from the plants or trees, they do not grow and hence they become a non-living things.

Are fruits living? ›

A new study finds that produce can be “trained” to specific circadian cycles, boosting their natural defenses against pests. The next time you wander amongst the produce in your local market, think about this: Those fruits and veggies are still alive.

What are non-living things in soil? ›

Soil Layers. Soil is composed of both biotic—living and once-living things, like plants and insects—and abiotic materials—nonliving factors, like minerals, water, and air. Soil contains air, water, and minerals as well as plant and animal matter, both living and dead.

Is wood non-living or living? ›

Wood that has been separated from a tree is considered dead because it is removed from the source of nutrients, much in the same way as meat from a butcher's shop is considered dead because the meat is not receiving nutrients from the animal because it is dead. ... To recap, wood that is attached to a tree is alive.

Are there any non-living things that grow? ›

Non-living things “grow” by accretion. It occurs through adding materials externally. For example, A snowball may increase in size due to the accumulation of smaller units of its own on its outer surface.

What are 3 living things in soil? ›

Earthworms, bacteria and fungi are just a few of the organisms that live in the soil, feed on the organic matter and decay or recycle plant nutrients.

What are 5 living organisms in soil? ›

Living organisms present in soil include archaea, bacteria, actinomycetes, fungi, algae, protozoa, and a wide variety of larger soil fauna including springtails, mites, nematodes, earthworms, ants, and insects that spend all or part of their life underground, even larger organisms such as burrowing rodents.

What are 10 living things? ›

Complete answer
  • PLANTS.
  • HUMANS.
  • ANIMALS.
  • INSECTS.
  • BIRDS.
  • AMPHIBIANS.
  • REPTILES.
  • MICRO-ORGANISMS.

What are 20 non-living things? ›

20 example of non-living things:

The example of non- living things are pen, table,phone,book,stool,almirah,bed,chair,bos,door,cot,black borad,mirror,machine,plate,sppone,cup.

Is sand a non-living? ›

Sand, wood and glass are all non-living things. None of them shows any of the characteristics listed above. Non-living things can be divided into two groups. First, come those which were never part of a living thing, such as stone and gold.

Is a plant a living thing? ›

Plants are living things. Plants are born and grow. Some plants, like geraniums, grow very quickly. Others, like oak trees, grow very slowly.

Is soil a living thing? ›

Soil is alive. There are more species of organisms in the soil than there are aboveground. These organisms include everything from badgers and gophers to bacteria and viruses that are invisible to the naked eye. A single handful of soil contains millions of individual living organisms.

Is a dead tree living or nonliving? ›

However, if a branch falls off or a person cuts down a tree, the wood is considered "dead" because it no longer transports living matter through itself. Wood that has been separated will dry up as the once-living protoplasm hardens.

Are trees living? ›

Trees, similar to all living things grow, reproduce, and respond to their environment. Trees, like all plants, manufacture their food through photosynthesis.

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